personal health information – the wrkshop

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personal health information – the wrkshop
personal growth
Image by Esthr
To me, the lowly growth chart is the epitome of personal health information: clear, tangible, friendly, aspirational. But most health info isn’t like that. Even though there’s lots of it around, very little of it is "liquid"­ – able to be used for the benefit of those individuals it concerns. Much of it is in paper form, and even electronic records are kept under virtual mattresses, held by institutions with no incentive to share it with the individuals or with other health-care providers. The way to solve this problem is not primarily with money, but by giving individuals the means as well as the right to control the disposition of their own information. They may not need to hold it personally, but they need the tools and services to determine how it is used and shared on their behalf.

Design credit: DAPHNE KIS

Friday the 13th … Four Ways to Manage Fear (December 11, 2013 / 8 Tevet 5774) …item 2b.. The Twilight Zone S05E15 The Long Morrow (January 10, 1964) …
personal growth
Image by marsmet549
Fear of the number 13 is known as triskaidekaphobia, while fear of Friday the 13th is known as paraskavedekatriaphobia.

President Franklin D. Roosevelt apparently suffered from triskaidekaphobia: According to The Huffington Post, he refused to travel on the 13th day of any month and would not host a dinner party with 13 guests.
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…..item 1)…. Four Ways to Manage Fear …

… aish.com … www.aish.com/sp/pg/

Home » Spirituality » Personal Growth
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img code photo … Four Ways to Manage Fear

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Don’t let your fear hold you back.

by Sara Debbie Gutfreund

December 11, 2013 / 8 Tevet 5774
Published: December 7, 2013

www.aish.com/sp/pg/Four-Ways-to-Manage-Fear.html

Danny Forster, the host of Discovery Channel’s Build It Bigger, a show about constructing enormous skyscrapers and towering bridges, is terrified of heights. On his first scouting trip as host, Forster’s acrophobia almost cost him his job. He had flown with the show’s producers to Glendale, Arizona to assess the show’s first target: the University of Phoenix Stadium, the new 5 million dollar home of the Arizona Cardinals. The plan was to have Forster start off the show by working on the stadium’s 240-foot-tall fabric-lined roof, but when they asked him to climb the ladder, he at first refused. Had they hired the wrong guy?

Forster’s passion to build pushed him to start climbing. He rode hundreds of feet up in man lifts and climbed onto roofs, not because he had overcome his fear of heights but because he was willing to be afraid and build anyway.
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The producers then realized that Forster’s fear of heights made him more human and became a selling point for the show. Danny’s terror in the face of hanging off the sides of buildings emphasized the real scale of the skyscrapers, and soon every episode of Build It Bigger began with a shot of Forster’s terrified face staring down a steep precipice and saying to himself: "This is not a good situation right now. Am I getting pale?"

Forster’s passion was greater than his fear. He forced himself to make up intelligent conversation and keep constructing despite his instinct to run to lower ground. And Forster was surprised when he discovered that he was even beginning to enjoy the climbing; but more importantly, he was able to stay true to what he valued in life, whether he was afraid or not.

Danny Forster’s story teaches us four ways to manage fear:

1. — Go through it. Most fears are deeply embedded in our psyches and don’t disappear just because we want them to. And avoiding the things that we are afraid of only intensifies our phobias. So climb up the ladder even when we are terrified. Come to the next building and keep going. Go through it and accept the fear as part of the climb.

2. — Be present. Don’t think about yesterday or tomorrow or even the next minute when you are walking through a fear. Staying in the present centers us and allows us to focus on what’s important right now. Forster did this by keeping up a steady patter of conversation as he went about building. If he would have stopped and studied himself hundreds of feet up in the air, he would have probably frozen from the anxiety.

3. — Train. Practice and experience are crucial for two reasons. One is that the more we practice in any area, the more confident we become. And two, the more experience we have, the better able we are to deal with unexpected obstacles when we are in scary situations.

4. — Focus on your values. What really motivates us to go through our fears is a commitment to a higher value or goal. It doesn’t matter what that goal is. For Forster it was building and sharing his passion for building with the world. Some people work with fear because they are focused on their love for another person. Others go through fear because they are passionate about a higher cause. Whatever it is, focusing on that higher value or goal weakens the potency of our fear.
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— Confronting My Fear

I thought about these ideas when I struggled to confront one of my own fears. We were at a bar mitzvah when the topic of running came up, and a few of us who run regularly were comparing our running times. I had never run a race before, but I ran on my own, timing myself with a running app.

When one of the veteran marathoners overheard my average mile time, he laughed. "If you can really run that fast, you should be racing. Why don’t you try?"

I didn’t take him seriously. Why would I want to be in a race? But deep down I knew why: I was scared – scared to run in front of anyone else, scared to fail, scared to even begin.

That’s when I decided I had to try. Registering for the race wasn’t as hard as I thought it would be. And although I was nervous on the morning of the race, my real fear didn’t surface until I saw the hundreds of other runners warming up near the starting line.

I pinned my number on my shirt and looked around me. Every single person looked like a ‘real’ runner. What if I couldn’t even finish the race? I considered going home. And if I would have just taken off my number and left, would it really have mattered? But as the megaphone blared: "On your mark get set…go!" I knew that it did matter. Not because of the race but because of my fear of the race.

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When I started off too fast and found myself out of breath by the second mile, I realized that I was reaching a wall. A wall of fear and limits that was inside of me. I didn’t want to stay behind that wall anymore. If I could go through this one fear, no matter how small or insignificant it was, then maybe I could learn something about more important fears in my life: I could live with them.

I made it to the finish line (I actually won the race). And the veteran marathoner had been right. You never know how fast you really are until you try. You never know how high you can build if you are afraid to climb. And when you reach the top of a building that you have constructed or cross the finish line that you never imagined was possible, you will see that your fear is still there. But you have learned to work with it. To run with it. To live with it.

And without even realizing it, you have already won.
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Published: December 7, 2013
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…..item 2a)…. The Long Morrow … From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia …
"The Long Morrow"

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Long_Morrow
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— Plot

Commander Douglas Stansfield (played by Robert Lansing), an astronaut in the year 1987, is sent to a planetary system 141 light-years from Earth. The trip will take 20 years each way. To save him the ordeal of 40 years of loneliness, he is to be placed in (newly developed) suspended animation for the 20 years until he gets there and then again for the 20 year return trip. The suspended animation will also prevent him from growing older, other than the few weeks he would be at the distant planetary system. Before leaving, he meets and becomes enchanted by his young colleague, Sandra Horn (played by Mariette Hartley). However, Horn would be 40 years older and Stansfield would still be young because of the suspended animation. Stansfield goes on his mission and 40 years later he returns (tragically, the job he was sent to do was already completed, using technology developed after he left). He thus returns a forgotten pioneer.

It is revealed upon his arrival home that he voluntarily disabled the suspended animation system about six months into his journey so that he would be the same age as Sandra when he finally returned. Unbeknownst to him, she had placed herself in suspended animation so that she would be his age. In the tragic end, an aged Stansfield sadly urges Horn to live her new life without him.

After Horn leaves, General Walters somewhat consoles him by saying, "Stansfield, you’re really quite an incredible man. Maybe the one distinction of my entire life, that I knew you…that I knew a man who put such a premium, on love. Truly…quite a distinction, Stansfield…"; Stansfield nods.

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— The Twilight Zone episode
Episode no. … Season 5
Episode 135
Directed by… Robert Florey
Written by… Rod Serling
Featured music … Stock
Production code … 2624
Original air date … January 10, 1964

Guest actors
… Robert Lansing: Commander Douglas Stansfield
… Mariette Hartley: Sandra Horn
… George Macready: Dr. Bixler
… Ed Binns: General Walters

Episode chronology
← Previous
"You Drive"Next →
"The Self-Improvement of Salvadore Ross"
List of Twilight Zone episodes
"The Long Morrow" is an episode of the American television anthology series The Twilight Zone.
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……item 2b)…. youtube video … The Twilight Zone S05E15 The Long Morrow Full Episode …

… 25:34 minutes …

www.youtube.com/watch?v=cKwuKAXX3vo

elf holbrook

Published on Sep 10, 2013

The Twilight Zone S05E15 The Long Morrow 15/36. Before leaving on a decades long mission, astronaut Douglas Stanfield meets a woman and falls in love.

Category
Film & Animation

License
Standard YouTube License
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19 APR 1988
1 MAY 1988
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Soaring Magazine (February 1961) – N7616B – Colorado …item 3.. Six Steps to Letting Go of Anger (October 29, 2012 / 13 Cheshvan 5773) …
personal growth
Image by marsmet545
N7616B – Colorado – Built by George Applebay and Mickey Jensen. First flight April 30, 1958. George now owns this glider again. Here is N7616B on the cover of Soaring Magazine in Feb. 1961:
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………*****All images are copyrighted by their respective authors ……..
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…..item 1)…. Cherokee II Sailplanes … cherokeesailplanes.blogspot.com

This is the home for everything related to Cherokee II Sailplanes. Email me at abcondon@gmail.com if you have anything to add.

— Comprehensive Listing of all known Cherokee II’s Worldwide

Wednesday, November 11, 2009

Cherokee II Roll Call

cherokeesailplanes.blogspot.com/2009/11/cherokee-ii-roll-…
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N7616B – Colorado – Built by George Applebay and Mickey Jensen. First flight April 30, 1958. George now owns this glider again. Here is N7616B on the cover of Soaring Magazine in Feb. 1961:

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I’m pretty sure this is 7616B in this photo from the September 1961 Soaring:

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…..item 2)…. Soaring Magazine Index for 1961 organized by issue … soaringweb.org

The contents have all been re-entered by hand, so there are going to be typos and confusion between author and subject, etc…

Please send along any corrections and suggestions for improvement.

Department, Columns, or Sections of the magazine are indicated within parentheses ‘( )’.
Subject, and sub-subject, are indicated within square brackets ‘[ ]’.
Click on a thumbnail cover to see the fullsized issue [they can be big!].

1961

soaringweb.org/Soaring_Index/1961/1961_issue.html
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February
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Henry Dittmer, Cherokee II of Wichita Cherokee Soaring Club (Cover) [Sailplanes\Cherokee II]
Record Flights [Awards\Records], page facing 1
SSA By-Law Changes [Soaring Society of America], page facing 1
SSA Election Results [Soaring Society of America], page facing 1
B.L. Moore, Let’s sell soaring – and SSA (Editorial) [Publicity], page 3
L.A. Niemi, A report on the Sisu 1 and Sisu 1A sailplanes (Feature Articles) [Sailplanes\Sisu 1; Sailplanes\Sisu 1a], page 4
H.M. Claybourn, Notes on the 28th annual US national soaring championships [Competitions], page 6
J.H. Lambie, 310 km. in the Fauvel (Feature Articles) [Awards\Flights; Sailplanes\Fauvel AV-36; Gliders], page 7
SSA membership contest prizes [EMGAM; Soaring Society of America], page 9
B. Paiewonsky, The handling characteristics of sailplanes – part 2 (Feature Articles) [Aerodynamics], page 10
H. Drew, Uniform trailer connections (Feature Articles) [Construction of Gliders; Trailers], page 12
SSA insurance plan news [Sailplane Insurance], page 13
R.E. Schreder, The HP-10 high performance sailplane (Feature Articles) [Sailplanes\HP-10], page 14
Material Available [Soaring Society of America], page 15
N. Delp, ed., (Club news) [Chapters, Clubs, and Affiliates], page 16
D. King, ed., (Canadian News) [International\Canada], page 18
W.E. (Tony) Doherty, Jr., Schweizer dealer’s meeting [Manufacturers], page 20
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…..item 3)…. aish.com … www.aish.com/sp/pg

HOME SPIRITUALITY PERSONAL GROWTH …
Six Steps to Letting Go of Anger

How to drop unresolved anger and find inner peace and emotional balance.
by Ali Begoun
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October 29, 2012 / 13 Cheshvan 5773

www.aish.com/sp/pg/Six-Steps-to-Letting-Go-of-Anger.html

Rachel was an elegant and well-dressed woman of 43, who consulted me following a bitter divorce from her husband of 15 years. Underneath her dignified exterior lay a thoroughly exhausted woman who spoke of the unbearable pain and anguish of her unhappy marriage.

Yet despite her fury toward the man who she felt had "ripped a sense of safety and security" from her life and that of her three school-age children, Rachel had an awareness we would all do well to internalize.

She recognized that blaming her husband for her present misery, no matter how justified and easy to do, would only keep her stuck and impotent. Hinging her emotional well-being on the actions of another person would only leave her feeling like a victim. Rachel knew that she was responsible for healing her own life, and that she alone was responsible for her happiness.

The recognition that a person can choose emotional well-being – even when life doesn’t turn out the way we want it – is the cornerstone of mental health. In that sense, Rachel was ahead of the game. She was willing and ready to let go of blame and embrace responsibility for her future. The road to letting go of anger and hurt still stretched before her, enormously daunting because of the deep pain she had been carrying around for years. But Rachel had hope, and she was willing to do the work.

Hanging onto anger doesn’t hurt the other person; it hurts us most of all.

Holding onto anger toward another person is like holding a sharp object in the palm of your hand. The harder you squeeze, the more you suffer. If we cast blame, saying, "He makes me so angry" or "She is ruining my life," it’s like blaming the sharp object for our pain – when we’re the one doing the squeezing! When we let go of anger and resentment, it’s like releasing our grip of the sharp object.

Hanging onto anger doesn’t hurt the other person; it hurts us most of all.

In my experience as a life and relationships coach, I’ve discovered six steps to letting go of the sharp pain and toxicity of unresolved anger, leading a person to inner peace and emotional balance.

Related Article: Anger Management
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— Step One: Identify the loss

Have you ever shared a deep pain with another person, and immediately been given advice on how to overcome it? Most of us can identify the resistance we feel when we open up and are immediately told to “look on the bright side” or “think positively” or “try to forgive.” A person has to first be given unfettered opportunity to identify how they have been hurt and what exactly they feel they’ve lost.

For Rachel, it was a relief to simply put into words what she perceived to be her biggest losses: the pleasure of loving and being loved by another person; her children’s challenge to have a normal and healthy upbringing. In this first step, Rachel didn’t need to shift her perspective or look at the situation differently; she needed to admit her loss and allow herself to feel it.
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— Step Two: Allow yourself to grieve

The Jewish laws of mourning are a wise system of graduated grief. In those first stages, the mourner doesn’t respond to greetings and he remains at home. It’s simply too early to offer comfort when the wound is so fresh.

Letting go of anger is no different. A person needs time to accept that the pain is real and to embrace the health that comes with allowing yourself to hurt for a while. The denial of refusing to grieve – "I am fine! I am strong! I’ll get over it!" – is not an indicator of strength.
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— Step Three: Let compassion replace resentment

There is a saying, "Hurt people hurt people."

Once a person has gone through the first two steps of letting go of anger, they are often ready to do the difficult but liberating work of shifting their perspective. This involves the recognition that people only act very badly when they feel very badly. If someone has hurt you, take a look at their history. No doubt they were deeply mistreated themselves, and the hurtful and infuriating behavior comes from a deep reservoir of personal pain.

When we focus on the bad behavior and what the person did to us, we naturally feel resentment. But by looking beyond the behavior to see the hurt emotionally-scarred person underneath, we can replace resentment with compassion.
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— Step Four: Forgive

As long as you remain bitter and unforgiving, you’re still squeezing the sharp object in your hand, blaming the object for your pain, and forgetting that you are the one doing the squeezing.

Forgiveness does not mean condoning or justifying any misdeeds. It’s not rejoining with the offender. It simply means giving up your desire for revenge and letting go of the expectation that s/he will make amends. It’s untying the knots that keep you emotionally entwined and prevent you from healing. It’s a conscious and deliberate decision, without which a person cannot fully heal.
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— Step Five: Look for the hidden gems

Everything the Almighty does is out of love, for our ultimate good and for an absolute purpose. Even in this upside-down world with seemingly so much difficulty, we can commit ourselves to looking for jewels behind the pain.

I remember pulling out a crumpled sheet of paper from my daughter’s backpack. On the top of the paper, it said "I’m thankful…“ and went on to describe many different challenges we all face, and the hidden blessing underneath. It’s a simple but life-transforming formula:

I’m thankful (insert a challenge you are experiencing) because it means that (insert the hidden gem underneath the struggle).

(My personal favorite is, "I’m thankful for my teenage daughter who is complaining about doing the dishes… because that means she isn’t on the streets!)

Rachel came up with many hidden gems, and here is one of them:

"I’m thankful for the pain of my divorce… because it helped me understand what is important to me and what behavior I will not accept. It has brought me closer to becoming the person I know I need to be to have a healthy marriage based on mutual respect."
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— Step Six: Write a letter

The last step in working through anger is to put pen to paper (if that’s possible anymore!) and write a letter to the person who hurt you. Most of the time it’s better not to send this letter. People who are suffering from a low self-esteem (which most offenders are) are likely to receive these words in an inaccurate and distorted way.

But there’s something about spelling out hurts and frustrations that allows you to release the anger. When a person clarifies their loss, and desires to forgive and move beyond the resentment, they often feel an automatic release of the anger that has left them debilitated for years.

Rachel wrote a letter to her ex-husband, read it out loud to me, and tore it up. It was the writing, not the sending (or any expectation of response) that set her free.

We all want to be focused and capable of enjoying our lives. We want to be aware of the Almighty’s loving hand, and be grateful for the infinite blessings that He constantly bestows upon us. We want to take pleasure in our children and be effective parents. We want to be an appreciative and loving spouse. We want to be a loyal friend and a productive employee.

But if we are experiencing unresolved anger, we won’t be able to live out those values that are most important to us. We’ll keep sabotaging those deeper relationships with anger, criticism, negativity or withdrawal.

Inner balance and personal security comes from an absolute commitment to taking personal responsibility for the quality of one’s life. This includes the willingness to release any unresolved anger.
Anyone, no matter what traumas they may have experienced, has the ability to get there.
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Comments

  1. TheAlieness GiselaGiardino²³ says:

    I like it A LOT. (All, the image, the composition, the meaning, the whole concept and the precise and so direct way you describe it all)

    I wish I could attend and participate (I admit my wish is also biased by the location ;-), but most of all I wish you and your team the bestest with the event. And with the deployment of the project, of course.

    Keep us informed!

  2. Marjorie Lipan says:
  3. Marjorie Lipan says:

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