Travel Back 50 Years to 1964 New York World’s Fair

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In 1964, the New York World’s Fair opened with radical technologies and dazzling futuristic displays.

Fifty-one million visitors descended on Flushing Meadows Park in Queens, N.Y. over two six-month seasons in 1964 and ’65 to experience innovations like “picturephones,” lunar crawlers and Belgian waffles. The Ford Times called it “a lively and lavish concoction of spectacular entertainment.”

Though a conflict with the Bureau of International Expositions (BIE) stripped the fair of an official sanction, the event represented an exciting time in American scientific advancements. While we still aren’t jetting to the moon to visit grandma in her space colony retirement village, technologies like robotic animation continue in special effects productions today. Read more…

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Every day you must unlearn the ways that hold you back. You must rid yourself of negativity, so you can learn to fly. -Leon Brown

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Every day you must unlearn the ways that hold you back. You must rid yourself of negativity, so you can learn to fly. -Leon Brown
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Every day you must unlearn the ways that hold you back. You must rid yourself of negativity, so you can learn to fly. -Leon Brown

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Image by Darien Library
2/19/08

Quote of the Day
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Image by Darien Library
5/19/08

Beastie Boys Fight Back in ‘Girls’ Parody Lawsuit: We Won’t Be Sold

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A legal battle over a parody video advertising a range of empowering girls’ toys got a lot more complicated Monday, as the Beastie Boys fought back against accusations made by toymaker GoldieBlox.

It began last week, when GoldieBlox’s ad “Girls,” based on the 1986 song by the rap trio, went viral (at the time of writing, it had 8.3 million views). The video features three young girls building a Rube Goldberg machine while adding new lyrics to the tune. The original song described women as objects of desire and purveyors of housework; the GoldieBlox version described them as scientists and engineers. Read more…

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